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Life on an Illinois Farm
When you sit down to have supper, do you ever wonder where everything you eat comes from? How did those pork chops get on your table? Farming in Illinois talks about various kinds of farming done in Illinois from crops to animals. Explore how the animals are raised. What kinds of machinery help the farmer do his chores? Find out how different farm-oriented organizations interact with the community. Join us and find out all about Farming in Illinois. Visit Site

Special Feeder Cattle Auction (Seasonal)

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Greenville Special Feeder Cattle Sale (Seasonal) GX_LS133
Walnut Special Feeder Cattle Sale (Seasonal) GX_LS134
Galesburg Livestock Auction (Wed) GX_LS136
Reels Livestock Auction (Thu) GX_LS137
Schuyler Livestock Sales at Rushville (Thu) GX_LS138
United Producers Inc, Shelbyville IL Livestock Auction (Wed) GX_LS139

Greenville Livestock Auction (Thu)

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Walnut Livestock Auction at Walnut (Fri)

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Schuyler Special Feeder Cattle Auction (Seasonal) GX_LS142
Galesburg Special Feeder Cattle Auction (Seasonal) GX_LS143
Reel Special Feeder Cattle Auction (Seasonal) GX_LS144

Eastern Cornbelt Direct Feeder Cattle Summary (Fri)

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Illinois Direct Slaughter Sows And Boars (Fri)

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Eastern Cornbelt Direct Feeder Pig Weekly Summary (Fri)

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Feeder Pig Auction For Greenville (Fri)

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Greenville Sheep And Lamb Auction (Fri)

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Eastern Cornbelt Direct Weekly Sheep Report (Fri)

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Carthage Wtd Avg Livestock Auction (Fri)

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Illinois Weekly Combined Wtd Avg Cattle Report (Fri)

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These are a few of the topics being discussed on our Forum.
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CattleToday.com
CattleToday's Q & A Boards are a Cattle Forum for swapping information and asking and answering questions about breed, health problems, beginners questions and jokes about cattle and horses.

Inline Hay Trailers
by Kenlofarms (Posted Wed, 18 Oct 2017 09:05:49 GMT+5)
thanks i do have about a 20 mile drive on a highway. The bales are 6x6 an i currently stack them and strap on a flat bed trailer. I'm looking for something quicker and easier.



Navy Beans and Cornbread
by Jogeephus (Posted Wed, 18 Oct 2017 08:59:07 GMT+5)
Bright Raven wrote:Jogeephus wrote:How are you cooking yours? Have you tried starting with broth? Cooking for 6-8 hours? Do you add some dry mustard near the end? Gotta be sure to cook the ham long enough that the internal temp of the ham gets to around 195F so it will just fall apart like pulled pork. Adding some fresh ground mustard near the end will also step up the game.

Soak beans in water. Put in crock pot. Cook for about 4 hours. Season with black pepper and add salt. Drop in cottage ham. Cook for another 2 hours.

Have not tried broth. What kind? Will try the mustard.

I have no idea how your mother's tasted but I'd be willing to bet she used broth rather than water. I normally use venison stock as a base but pork or chicken works good. Also, I don't think you are cooking the meat long enough. True, Cottage ham is already smoked and essentially cooked but I think you'll find it will taste better if you put the beans in the stock along with the ham and cook in the crock pot for 6 hours or better with the last hour or so being uncovered to reduce and thicken and concentrate the flavors. By doing it this way you will insure that the ham breaks down properly - like pulled pork - and in so doing it will release a lot of the intramuscular fats to the beans which will give you a much better flavor. As for mustard, I'll either grind seed or use Colman's. Not much. Maybe a teaspoon to the pot but mustard really goes well with ham and it will only be a background flavor at a low rate. You will know you are finished when your spoon will break the ham into itsy bitsy pieces and it is as tender as pudding. My wife and MIL make this and cornbread a lot. When chilled it has the firmness of hummus only its not as pasty. Good stuff. And cheap.



Protein Tubs
by farmerjan (Posted Wed, 18 Oct 2017 08:54:05 GMT+5)
We use some 20% All natural protein tubs on occasion. No point in using the 28% ones when the extra protein is urea and the cows basically get no benefit out of it. These are "cooked" tubs I guess, they seem to last quite awhile so if they are poured then the cattle must be getting what they need without going crazy over them. It may seem like a high price for protein for some, compared to DDG or "cubes" or anything else; but sometimes the convenience and time saving is worth the price. Haven't priced them this year.
We will be getting feed delivered soon, usually get 4-6 tons in each of the 2 bins and it will take us through the better part of the winter unless it gets real cold. I do feed a fair amount when my nurse cows are fresh. Right now I have 3 that have come fresh in the last 10 days... one just yesterday so I will be looking for a couple more calves to put on her. She raised 3 last year as a first calf heifer. The other 2 will raise 2 each, the jersey is only 2 good teats this year and the guernsey is just on older cow that I rescued and she doesn't have much milk but is a good momma. Trying to get a heifer from her to keep as a replacement. They get fed pretty good in the barn as I get the calves going on them and get them up to a higher production level. Plus, I milk for the house.

Bryant is right about the getting in and out and distance to some places. We still take some feed when we go to pastures and call them in. But I can't always get there as often as I like, and this way I know they are getting a little extra. Have never had them turn down a little feed in the pens when they have had tubs also, so I don't see a conflict. They will come when called if they don't beat me to the pens first. We don't have "cubes" available here but use pellets or sweet feed to call them in.

They all have grass and hay to choose from in the winter time. Sometimes they will work on the hay but during warm snaps, they will be out working on the grass. I like that the tubs offer the cows a little extra if they need it and the calves do learn to start "eating" a bit too. Makes them more interested in trying the feed in the troughs .



Bull calf can't stop urinating
by Caustic Burno (Posted Wed, 18 Oct 2017 08:51:01 GMT+5)
dun wrote:tabithaab wrote:Thanks for replying, Greybeard. Heading BACK to the vet today. This "free" bottle baby definitely hasn't been cheap!
Sometimes it means that someone finally got "free" of having to spend money on it themselves

Quit bottle calves years ago.
I am off cheaper to give them to a lady at church that runs a couple jerseys.



Tire Dry Rot ?
by BRYANT (Posted Wed, 18 Oct 2017 08:50:56 GMT+5)
ALACOWMAN wrote:The tires on my flat bed gooseneck maybe older than some of you..I've put gorilla snot in them,and keep max air pressure...
Where did you buy a Gorilla at?

just a joke but what is Gorilla snot



New castration band on the market?
by BRYANT (Posted Wed, 18 Oct 2017 08:40:30 GMT+5)
slit the bottom of the sack on them big calves and they will fall of a lot faster, like a couple weeks. If I band big calves, which I don't like to do, I keep a pair of ear notching pliers with me and clip a drain in each side, fast and works great.



A few of our 2017 fall calves
by lithuanian farmer (Posted Wed, 18 Oct 2017 08:35:03 GMT+5)
Nice calves and heifers! Always enjoy your photos.



fence tips and tricks
by callmefence (Posted Wed, 18 Oct 2017 08:33:57 GMT+5)
greybeard wrote:callmefence wrote:

Y'all are rolling it out in the wrong direction. North rolls have to rolled to the north. East to the east etc
Says the guy that's rolling wire out from the wrong side. You have the roll on upside down. Everyone knows that in this hemisphere, you have to unroll it off the other (right) side and if the roll is sitting horizontal, it has to come off from the top of the roll and not the bottom...

Good eye Greybeard..
It does make a slight difference. Agreed. Not as big a difference as toilet paper. I just threw a partial roll up there for the photo and didn't pay attention. You caught me..



How 'bout them Astros?
by True Grit Farms (Posted Wed, 18 Oct 2017 07:49:18 GMT+5)
The Dodgers slumped at the right time for sure. I like the Yankees.



johnsongrass hay
by ClinchValley (Posted Wed, 18 Oct 2017 06:57:55 GMT+5)
Ha. I guess that means I should get them for a better deal next time. I was just glad to get some hay last winter. Do not want to go through that again.



Pics or it didn't happen
by cattleman99 (Posted Wed, 18 Oct 2017 06:46:25 GMT+5)
Simmental bring a premium here. You want Simmental influence in your cow herd. The auctioneers often refer to the blacks with white faces as the ones with the "money stripe." Take two similar bulls with the same bloodlines put them in the ring together in the spring and sell choice. The money stripe goes first and add around 1k to the price. Simmental have done a great job of promoting the breed in Canada and they work here. Herefords were almost extinct here a few years back. Getting to be a few breeders the past few years but you would have to drive 80-90 miles to find any around here.



Grazing stalks sprouted corn
by callmefence (Posted Wed, 18 Oct 2017 06:38:30 GMT+5)
Yes it looks like I was wrong. I use hybrid Sudan and Johnson grass which I thought was quite similar to corn in pa and nitrate production.
My apologies for the bad info.



took in 7 wt steers
by ddd75 (Posted Wed, 18 Oct 2017 06:33:59 GMT+5)
i took in 7 steers and 2 heifers.. 1 crazy eye / neck heifer (she almost died in a hayring) I took in a good heifer as well at almost 800 lbs// they both brought 1.21. I wish I would of kept her though, she was really nice.

calf crop for next year looks even better.. they are gaining so much weight with these new grasses. At my old farm with the same management these calves would of been about 100 - 150 lbs less.



Tx sales
by elkwc (Posted Wed, 18 Oct 2017 05:50:19 GMT+5)
BK9954 wrote:elkwc wrote:It has always made me wonder why in many areas most if not all cows are run through one head at a time. Here on cows going back to the country are usually sold in groups and many times butcher cows are also. Each area does it differently. I know most of the sales in this area has went to either weighing before or after they go through the ring. Watched one on the internet a few weeks ago and everything was ran through the ring and then were on the scale with weight showing while being sold. Had never saw that before.
They do groups here sometimes, you can request it as the seller. When they do it keeps the guys like me on a budget from bidding but can raise the price. They don't sell by the pound when they do it here. Some times when they bring a group in they still offer choice to the first winner.

My BIL owned an interest in a sale barn for several years. One reason they sell cattle even butcher cows by the head is it speeds up the sale. Another like you mentioned is many feel it raises the price. I know that a person only wanting a few head like me two years ago it makes it hard to find quality cattle here in 1-2 head groups. Usually the singles are the cuts.



School me on the .223
by snoopdog (Posted Wed, 18 Oct 2017 04:52:04 GMT+5)
Thanks everyone , I will pick up some ammo today , maybe a couple different weights and see how it works . Igenerally use my model 70 in 270 for most chores , but it's a little unwieldy at times . If this works out I may have to look around .



cattletoday.xml

BEWARE OF POTENTIAL THREAT TO DEER POPULATIONS
Diseases are a big concern for deer biologists and managers. Since the reestablishment of white-tailed deer across the Southeast, hemorrhagic disease has had a negative impact on their populations. Hemorrhagic disease in deer can be caused by epizootic hemorrhagic disease viruses, or bluetongue viruses, and is spread by black gnats.
SVF CATTLE COUNTRY COMMERCIAL REPLACEMENT SALE HELD AUG. 31ST
One thousand, one hundred and eleven commercial females from Florida's leading ranchers found ready acceptance at the recent Cattle Country Sale in Brighton, Fla.
IT'S THE PITTS -- A MOTHER'S PLEA
I'm not in the mood today to try and be funny. And normally I don't believe writers should use their podium to preach to people. In most cases I don't have the qualifications or the credentials.
HUNTIN' DAYLIGHT -- DEMAND-AGGRESSIVE MARKETING BUOY CATTLE PRICES
Cattle numbers continue to grow with national cowherd expansion, and various data suggest herd expansion is continuing this year.
CHUTE-SIDE VACCINE COOLER IS A USEFUL TOOL
A few simple steps can help cattle producers become more effective in battling respiratory disease in their herd, get full value of any vaccine they purchase, and possibly increase their operational profit in the process.
PRODUCERS BENEFIT FROM YEAR-ROUND HERD HEALTH PROGRAM
Many times a producer does not consider or appreciate the value of a good year-round herd health program until confronted with a difficult calving season or an unacceptable level of calf loss from health challenges.
GET CALVES STARTED ON THE RIGHT FOOT AT WEANING
During this time of the year, some producers may consider preconditioning beef calves prior to sale. This involves a multi-step process including weaning, a defined health protocol, nutrition, and marketing plan. The following article describes a few helpful tips for weaning and getting calves started on the right foot:
EARLY WEANING BENEFITS FIRST-CALF COWS
Summer heat can be hard on pastures, cows and calves, especially first-calf cows. These cows are in a special class as they are still trying to maintain body condition, actively grow, support reproduction by gestating with her second calf, and lactating.
PRODUCT HANDLING IS CRITICAL TO HERD HEALTH SUCCESS
The cow-calf production unit is the basis for the entire beef industry. The production of quality calves requires strict attention to the health of all calves, cows and bulls in the facility.
HYDRAULIC CALF TABLES MAKE LIVESTOCK HANDLING EASIER
Chutes and calf tables have made livestock handling easier—on the animals, and for the people doing the job, whether branding, castrating, dehorning, implanting calves, etc.
IT'S THE PITTS -- RATTLED
Despite having lived in, or near, rattlesnake country my entire life I've never known anyone who actually got bit by one, let alone got bit and lived to tell the tale. Until now, that is.
DO YOUR HOMEWORK BEFORE BUYING BULLS
As the bull-buying season gets underway, commercial cattlemen should do their homework to help ensure the bull(s) they purchase this year meet their needs.
PREWEANING CALF MANAGEMENT PRACTICES ADD VALUE TO FEEDERS
The concept of a value added calf (VAC) program is not new today, but in the late 1980's it was thought to have little value in some circles.
THE WORLD ACCORDING TO HOOTER MCCORMICK -- NO WORSTER
LeRoy was ancient. The lines in his face looked deep enough to hide in. His hair, mostly silver now, was still thick; his black eyes continued to sparkle with mischief.
DO HOMEWORK BEFORE HEADING INTO BULL BUYING SEASON
When it comes to genetics, bull selection is the most important decision the cow-calf producer has to make.

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